Frogs

frogs

Ku-ring-gai has a variety of water habitats, making it a perfect place for our frogs. A total of 17 species have been recorded, with our frog population constantly changing. With high rains, wet season frogs like the Striped Marsh Frog will thrive, while during a dry year, tree frogs will flourish. Frogs are rarely seen during the day, emerging at night to search for breeding ponds and potential mates.

Explore some of Ku-ring-gai's frog species below.

Get involved in tracking our frogs with the Frog ID national citizen science project.

Peron's Tree Frog (Litoria peronii)

Perons-tree-frog.png

Calls

A drill-like call, which has also been described as a ‘maniacal cackle’. Peak calling period September through to January.

Listen to their call here.

Description

A large species of frog reaching up to 7cm in body length. It has a grey or light brown back, with or without darker mottling, and several to many tiny emerald-green spots. There is a thin black line along the skin fold from behind the eye to the top of the arm. The pupil appears crossed-shaped and the iris is silver. Very common and widespread throughout Ku-ring-gai.


Striped Marsh Frog (Limnodynastes peronii)

striped-marsh-frog

Calls

A single, loud ‘plonk’ or ‘toc’, like a dripping tap, repeated at intervals of a few seconds. Peak calling period October through to April.
Listen to their call here.

Description

A very common and widespread species, the hardy Striped Marsh Frog can live in almost any permanent water source in Sydney. This large frog, reaching up to 7.5cm in body length, has a mottled, striped brown body, often with a pale cream or reddish stripe down its back.


Common Eastern Froglet (Crinia signifera)

common-eastern-froglet

Calls

‘Crick-crick-crick’ sounds like a ratchet. Peak calling period February through to October. Listen to their call here.

Description

A small species of frog reaching up to 3cm in body length. It has a brown, grey, cream, beige, reddish or mustard yellow back, with or without longitudinal stripes, spots or patches. There are small dark triangular patches along the upper lip. The belly is grey, with white and black mottling. Common and widespread throughout Ku-ring-gai.


Green Stream Frog (Litoria phyllochroa)

green-stream-frog

Calls

An ‘erk…erk…erk’ sound. Peak calling period October through to February. Listen to their call here.

Description

A medium-sized species of frog reaching up to 4cm in body length. It has a bright green or olive-green back, which can become very dark when the frog is inactive. There is a thin gold or silver stripe that extends from the tip of the past the arm. There is also a black stripe that follows underneath the gold or silver stripe, beginning form the eye. The belly is white, sometimes with small black flecks. Widespread throughout Ku-ring-gai.


Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog (Litoria fallax)

eastern-dwarf-tree-frog  

Calls

‘Reek…pip, reek…pip…pip’ sound. Peak calling period October through to February. Listen to their call here.

Description

A small species of frog reaching up to 2.5cm in body length. It has a bright green or bronze back, with a bronze stripe from the tip of the snout along the sides if the back is green, or small green patches if the back is bronze. There is a white stripe from under the eye to the arm. The belly is white, and the male has a yellow throat. Recent records in Ku-ring-gai are from St Ives and North Turramurra.


Red-crowned Toadlet (Pseudophryne australis)

red-crowned-toadlet  

Calls

They call several times in quick succession, as these frogs often live in small colonies. Peak calling period July through to February. Listen to their call here.

Description

An unmistakable small species of frog measuring less than 3cm in body length. It has a dark grey or dark brown back, with bright red or orange patches on the head and lower back. This species has a restricted distribution, found only in the Sydney Basin, occurring in wet drainage lines amongst leaf litter below sandstone ridges. This species is listed as threatened (Vulnerable) under the NSW Biodiversity Conservation Act.


Bleating Tree Frog (Litoria dentata)

bleating-tree-frog

Calls

Call is a long, penetrating, wavering bleap. Peak calling period October through to February. Listen to their call here

Description

A medium-sized species of frog reaching up to 4.5cm in body length. It has a light brown or cream-coloured back, with a wide, brown longitudinal stripe along the middle. The belly is cream-coloured, and the male has a yellow throat. Uncommon in Ku-ring-gai.

All images courtesy of Photo: Jodi Rowley © Australian Museum


Track your local frogs

frogID

FrogID is Australia’s national citizen science project run by the Australian Museum, helping us learn more about our local frogs. Monitoring so far has revealed a clear top 3 for the most common species recorded in Ku-ring-gai: Peron’s Tree Frog, Striped Marsh Frog and the Common Eastern Froglet. Some rarer species have also been identified, including the Bleating Tree Frog and the tiny Red-crowned Toadlet, a threatened species with a restricted distribution. Get involved today.