Design guidelines

A guide to designing proposed works on a heritage property

 

Scale and Character

Materials and Details

Roofs and Chimneys

Verandas

Colour Schemes

Windows and Doors

Garages, Carports and Driveways

Front Gates and Fences

Pools and Tennis Courts

Gardens

Dormers and skylights

 

Scale and Character

  • additions should be designed to respect the form and style of the existing building – they should not overwhelm or visually dominate the existing building

Materials and Details

  • materials should generally match, but new materials should be able to be read as later work, not part of the original building, e.g. the material for windows should be the same as the existing building - mortar should be replaced by new mortar of similar strength and colour
  • details can be different to the existing building but should generally match those used in the architectural period, e.g, Federation details should not be used on Californian bungalow styles

Roofs and Chimneys

  • roofs should match existing form and massing, should not dominate and not involve more elaborate detail
  • cladding materials should match the existing
  • chimneys should be retained as traditional elements and because they are often the ‘signature’ of the designer

Verandas

  • verandas are appropriate to the majority of building styles in Ku-ring-gai
  • verandas and porches should be retained and not infilled
  • it is desirable to remove infill work

Colour Schemes

The choice of colours is up to the owner/occupier of the property. As a guide:

  • traditional colours can be matched to the style of the house and can enhance the appearance
  • colour schemes can be based on original or later schemes determined by paint scrapes or other investigative processes
  • new schemes can be used but generally should use three to four colours with architectural details picked out in contrasting colours

Windows and Doors

  • New windows and door openings should generally match the existing in proportion and materials

Garages, Carports and Driveways

  • garaging was not common until after the 1920s and can have a major detrimental impact on a heritage item and can affect the streetscape.  When garages were added, they were often simple shed structures in the rear yard
  • must be sited to rear, side or under existing house and not in front and preferably detached in the rear yard
  • for double garages, doors should be separate
  • additional car spaces should be designed to appear to be secondary and may designed as a lean-to addition to reduce the overall bulk
  • carports should be simple open structures without decoration
  • original gravel drives should be retained
  • wheel strips with grass or gravel infill are preferred
  • driveways should be single car width so they do not dominate gardens
  • where existing circular drives exist, they should be retained

Front Gates and Fences

  • front fences and gates should be appropriate to the architectural period/style of the house

  • should not form visual barriers so that relationship to the streetscape is retained and the height must be appropriate

  • must be consistent with other Council fence policies

Pools and Tennis Courts

  • pool and tennis courts are new elements and generally acceptable provided they can be accommodated on the site in an appropriate location and do not require removal of significant trees or garden elements and do not have an adverse impact on the setting
  • must conform with other Council policies

Gardens

  • are a strong and distinctive part of the heritage of Ku-ring-gai
  • gardens can have individual significance
  • new gardens should be appropriate for the style and period of the house
  • existing mature trees are protected and should be retained

Dormers and skylights

  • flat open able skylights are usually acceptable on roofs, but should be located in an unobtrusive location, not on main elevation and the size must be appropriate
  • dormers are common to certain architectural styles and not appropriate on some styles
  • dormers must be carefully located and of an appropriate size